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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Can I get a copy of the Preferred Blueprint Alternative?
  2. How do I request a Blueprint Presentation for my meeting or event?
  3. I'm interested to learn more about the PLACE3S software. Who do I contact?
  4. I'm a developer constructing or applying for a permit for a smart growth project. Can I get a Blueprint stamp of approval?
  5. What was the purpose of the countywide workshops?
  6. What is a "scenario?"
  7. How many land use/transportation alternative scenarios will be analyzed at each countywide workshop?
  8. Who created the scenarios considered in the public workshops?
  9. How were the results of the neighborhood Blueprint workshops used in developing the alternative countywide scenarios?
  10. What planning issues will be addressed in these scenarios?
  11. How many countywide workshops were held?
  12. How were the workshops structured?
  13. Who was invited to attend the countywide workshops and how were they publicized?
  14. How were the results from the countywide workshops used in creating alternative regional land use/transportation scenarios?
  15. Who started the Blueprint Project and why?
  16. How is the project being conducted?
  17. Who will be responsible to implement the results of the Blueprint Project?
  18. Will the results of the Blueprint Project affect future Metropolitan Transportation Plan priorities?
  19. What if the results of the Blueprint Project conflict with local General Plans?
  20. Will the Blueprint Project result in a regional land use plan?





  1. Can I get a copy of the Preferred Blueprint Alternative?
    SACOG produced a special publication PDF document for the Preferred Blueprint Alternative. Also you may request to receive a CD-Rom with individual jurisdiction maps and summary statistics, or you may download them from the Preferred Blueprint Alternative Web page.
  2. How do I request a Blueprint Presentation for my meeting or event?
    Contact Blueprint staff at blueprint@sacog.org or (916) 340-6249. Relay the date, time, and location of the event or meeting; audience; and preferred length of presentation. Blueprint staff will respond to your request in a timely manner.
  3. I'm interested to learn more about the PLACE3S software. Who do I contact?
    Kacey Lizon, SACOG, (916) 340-6265, klizon@sacog.org.
  4. I'm a developer constructing or applying for a permit for a smart growth project. Can I get a Blueprint stamp of approval?
    The SACOG Board of Directors will not endorse any development project. However, at the request of the SACOG Board, Blueprint Technical Staff are available to do technical analysis on particular development plans or projects and provide a letter of analysis with findings.
  5. What was the purpose of the countywide workshops?

    To build knowledge with local government staff, officials and stakeholders of the linkages between land use patterns and transportation behavior

    To receive input from the public on what they like and dislike about alternative scenarios for land use patterns and transportation systems.

  6. What is a "scenario?"
    A map of a county that illustrates where different types of development occur during a 50-year timeframe, together with a related transportation system (i.e. major roads, light rail lines, etc.).
  7. How many land use/transportation alternative scenarios will be analyzed at each countywide workshop?
    Four.
  8. Who created the scenarios considered in the public workshops?
    Planners from each local government worked with SACOG staff in countywide teams to analyze the results of the neighborhood workshops and develop the alternative scenarios.
  9. How were the results of the neighborhood Blueprint workshops used in developing the alternative countywide scenarios?

    At the end of the neighborhood workshop series, the region's residents had created approximately 250 planning scenarios for about 60 infill and Greenfield study areas, ranging in size from nine acres to 1,500 acres (average of about 200 acres).

    The neighborhood plans were being evaluated and summarized. The results were used in the alternative countywide scenarios, both for the parcels within the study areas, and for other areas in the county that share similar characteristics.

    However, many decisions needed to be made in building the countywide scenarios that extended beyond the geography and issues that were explored in the neighborhood workshops. The local government planners provided essential input to SACOG staff in determining how to address these issues in the various scenarios.

  10. What planning issues will be addressed in these scenarios?

    The scenarios were designed to examine a wide range of planning issues. The specific issues were tailored to match unique local conditions. Among the common issues examined were:

    • overall amount of residential and employment growth
    • balance of land uses (jobs and houses, retail/non-retail jobs) within counties and sub-areas
    • diversity of housing stock
    • amount of mixed use infill and redevelopment, particularly in transportation corridors/nodes
    • overall compactness of development
    • location of development in regards to natural resource lands
  11. How many countywide workshops were held?
    Seven: three in Sacramento County, and one each in Yolo, Yuba, Sutter and Placer Counties.
  12. How were the workshops structured?

    Participants worked in small groups to discuss and critique the alternative countywide land use/transportation related scenarios. As a group they will select a scenario from the four scenarios at their table that they like the best and then made refinements to it.

    The PLACE3S computer software, menus and stickers were used at each table (similar to the neighborhood workshops) to record the input and provide real-time feedback to participants.

    SACOG and local government staff provided small group facilitation.

  13. Who was invited to attend the countywide workshops and how were they publicized?

    SACOG's Memorandum of Understanding with Valley Vision continued the partnership successfully used to recruit broad representation in the neighborhood workshops. In addition, information was disseminated through the news media, through advertising and news stories, and through the use of the sacregionblueprint.org Web site. Participants in the neighborhood workshops were the primary target for participation in the countywide workshops, but expanded representation was sought as well. Between 100 and 300 participants were at each workshop.

  14. How were the results from the countywide workshops used in creating alternative regional land use/transportation scenarios?

    The alternative countywide scenarios were used to create the alternative regional scenarios. Based on the public input, and the input directly from the local government staff and elected officials, the alternative countywide scenarios were coordinated into regional scenarios.

    These regional scenarios were evaluated by the public, starting at the April 30, 2004 Regional Forum at the Sacramento Convention Center.

  15. Who started the Blueprint Project and why?

    The local elected officials that comprise the SACOG Board initiated the Blueprint Project in 2002.

    The motivation for the project was to determine if there are alternatives to current transportation investment priorities and land use patterns that would make improvements to the region's travel patterns and air quality, while being consistent with local attitudes and values.

  16. How is the project being conducted?

    Each of the local governments voluntarily decides whether or not to participate in the project.

    The project is developing state-of-the-art information and analysis tools to support local government decision-making, both in local City Councils and Boards of Supervisors, and at the regional SACOG Board of Directors. The premise of the study is based on the democratic principle that increased knowledge leads to improved decision-making.

    The project is also committed to the democratic principle of broad participation. For example, it is using interactive computer software to help citizen planners better understand the impacts of their opinions and choices.

  17. Who will be responsible to implement the results of the Blueprint Project?

    This will be determined by the results of the study. We do not yet know the answer to the question about the merits of alternative land use patterns and transportation investment priorities.

    If the elected officials on the SACOG Board determine that there changes to land use patterns or transportation investments that are warranted then a strategy for pursuing those changes will be developed. It is expected that if such a strategy is developed that it would work through existing responsibilities and authorities. Local governments make land use decisions, local officials through the SACOG Board make regional transportation investment decisions. State and federal transportation agencies may also need to be included in an implementation strategy.

  18. Will the results of the Blueprint Project affect future Metropolitan Transportation Plan priorities?

    This cannot be known until the study is completed and the results known. Since the Board initiated the study to help it make transportation investment decisions it is expected that the study results, where appropriate, will be used in that manner.

    For example, two cities might prefer a new light rail extension. One city may be willing to take land use actions that would help ensure strong transit ridership, while another city may not. It seems plausible to expect that this factor would affect the Board's decision about where to place the next light rail extension.

  19. What if the results of the Blueprint Project conflict with local General Plans?

    General Plans are not static documents. They change several times every month in various places throughout the region. Every local government General Plan will go through several minor and major updates over the 50-year time horizon of the Blueprint Project.

    Some local governments may decide to amend their General Plans based on new knowledge from the Blueprint Project. That will be their decision. SACOG has no authority to compel a local government to amend its General Plan.

    Several local governments have already indicated to SACOG that they have used Blueprint Project information to refine draft General, Community or Specific Plan documents. Other local governments have asked SACOG for assistance using Blueprint analysis tools to assist in updates to General, Community and Specific Plans in the near future.

  20. Will the Blueprint Project result in a regional land use plan?

    See question 3. The implementation strategy for Blueprint will be developed by local officials when the results of the study are known. SACOG has no authority to develop a regional land use plan that is binding on the actions of the local governments. It is certainly possible, however, that an implementation strategy could include recommended maps and policies to serve as guides for local and regional decision-making.